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News & Events

18/01/2017

Need to brush up on ethics? Here's a couple of places to start

By Katrin Matthews

Recently, as part of our INT Project, NAATI surveyed practitioners about the current revalidation system. We found that the majority of practitioners surveyed preferred to do online training to meet professional development requirements.

As NAATI's Revalidation Officer, I am often asked about what kind of activities practitioners could do that do not require face-to-face attendance at conferences or seminars. Whilst there are more and more online workshops available now, NAATI does also accept self-directed learning activities for the ethics section.

Under section 1.5 of our PD catalogue, a practitioner can choose to read an article (or articles) about translating and interpreting ethics and write a 700 word report about the content of the article.

But where can you find this sort of material? There are a number of texts available in libraries, however there are a number of good articles that can easily be found online.

Below are some links to free ethics material. Whilst this is not a comprehensive list, or representative of all the literature available today, these links are a good starting point to do some more research yourself -

General resources

Translation specific material

Interpreting specific material

When using these or other texts please make sure you quote your source and provide the 700 word report along with your other revalidation documentation. You can claim 20 points for one report (maximum of 20 points per year) under section 1.5.

If you have any further questions, please contact me at revalidation@naati.com.au.

Katrin Matthews has been NAATI's Revalidation Officer since 2013. She has a Masters in German as a Second Language from the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. In 1992 Katrin did an internship with UNSW in Sydney as part of her course in Munich, and subsequently moved to Australia with her Australian husband and their children in 2000. She has been teaching German in Australia since 2001, first at UTS in Sydney and then at ANU in Canberra, as well as teaching and assessing German with DFAT. Katrin is also a certified examiner for the Goethe Institute.

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10/01/2017

Staying focused on translation as a freelance translator

By Nicole Adams

In today's world, being online is a given, and our translation practices couldn't run without some Internet presence. Freelance translators, at least those working in the private sector, need to have a website as an online business card for potential clients.

However, I have noticed a trend for translators, especially our younger colleagues, to become distracted from their profession by social media.

Although I dabbled in social media at one point, I now have neither a Facebook page for my business, a Twitter account, or a LinkedIn profile, as I am a very private individual and do not enjoy being 'out there'.

When I had a look around social media recently, I noticed that some colleagues build a bubble and appear to be important figures but are not actually prominent outside the confines of their group.

Although they are considered an 'industry influencer' amongst their followers, most other established professionals in the same field are not even aware of them.

So having accumulated lots of followers or group members on social media means nothing in the real world and may not be an indicator of whether or not someone runs a successful professional translation practice.

I would guess that the majority of translators don't have the time or need to use social media, so don't be ashamed to be one of them!

Social media is a good tool for staying in touch with friends and family around the globe, but I see it as a distraction when it comes to our businesses.

If you feel at all pressured to use social media, to set up a hundred accounts and force yourself to engage when it's not in your nature, please don't.

Your time would be spent much more wisely attending local translator events or visiting events your clients might be attending, to forge real-life relationships. Those are the ones that are likely to turn into fruitful collaborations.

A lot of younger colleagues also seem to feel pressured to 'diversify'. A few years ago, when I followed a suggestion by an AUSIT past president to put together a book presenting a snapshot of colleagues who happily diversify, I was amazed.

Amazed because I personally wouldn't consider doing anything but translating and, as an introvert who hates the spotlight, I wouldn't have the impetus or energy to, say, present at conferences or host webinars.

Just putting that book together was hard work, and to be honest not all that enjoyable as I had to put my translation business on the back burner for a few months. It made me realise that all those colleagues who happily diversify may not be doing much translation proper, and that that isn't an avenue I'd like to go down personally.

Although I did invest in a certificate in business coaching at one point (along with a dozen other certificates ranging from airport management to nutrition), I never put it to use, as it just isn't who I am or what I'm interested in doing.

I did have a single coaching session with one colleague at her request, and although it was only one hour of my time, I felt terribly guilty for charging to help a colleague, so I have never repeated the exercise and much prefer to stick to mentoring free of charge through translator associations, which I believe is what will continue to drive the profession.

I became a translator to translate. While I don't judge colleagues who choose to engage in a variety of other activities, I would encourage you to concentrate on translating if that's what makes you happy.

When you translate 100% of your time, the sky's the limit when it comes to your income. Why would you want to take away from that to sell a few hundred dollars’ worth of products or ancillary services, when you could have earned thousands translating in the same amount of time?

That makes no sense to me, hence I'll continue to stick to only translating, without looking at other income streams. This has worked for me over the past 15 years, so I'll proudly represent our profession for the next 15 years too, and I invite you to join me.

Nicole Y. Adams is a certified commercial German/English translator and editor based in Brisbane, Australia. She has been practising since 2003 and specialises in marketing, corporate communications and public relations. Nicole holds a Masters in Contemporary English Language and Linguistics from the University of Reading (UK) and was awarded Chartered Linguist status for Translation in 2014.

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23/12/2016

PD Opportunity: Interpreting Workshop Accuracy in Legal Interpreting

Introduction

Accuracy is one of the AUSIT Code of Ethics’ principle ethical requirements for interpreters and translators. Most practitioners would also agree that this is their primary responsibility. However, the concept of accuracy is a complex one which is often ‘interpreted’ in many different ways.

In this workshop we will review the concept of accuracy in the legal context. Accuracy is paramount in legal interpreting and it is an important principle that makes possible the fair administration of justice in police interviews and the courtroom (among others). We will explore police interrogation techniques and the taxonomy of courtroom questions in order to analyse the impact accuracy has in the translated discourse regarding legal outcomes

Biography

Dr. Erika Gonzalez is a lecturer and tutor at UNSW and UWS, where she teaches translation and interpreting at undergraduate and postgraduate level. She also works as a freelance translator and conference interpreter. She completed a PhD on professionalism in community interpreting and believes that education and training are the key for achieving high professional standards and recognition. Erika is also the AUSIT national PD co-ordinator.

Key Details

  • Date: Tuesday 17 January
  • Time: 6pm to 8pm
  • Venue: TAFE SA, Room: E 409, 120 Currie St Adelaide
  • Cost: AUSIT/ASLIA member $40, Non-member $60, AUSIT student member $20, Non member student $30
  • Snacks and refreshments will be served.

Click here for more details or to register.

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22/12/2016

PD opportunity: Translation workshop in South Australia

Introduction

As translators we continually make choices at grammatical, terminological and stylistic level in the course of our assignments. However, many times these choices are made in an automatic manner, without considering the theories that back up the choices we make. In this dynamic workshop, we will explore several translation theories such as equivalence, skopos, domestication and foreignisation, in order to acquire a deeper understanding regarding the choices we make. At the end of the workshop, the participants will have the opportunity to complete a practical task where they´ll have to apply the reviewed theories.

Biography

Dr. Erika Gonzalez is a lecturer and tutor at UNSW and UWS, where she teaches translation and interpreting at undergraduate and postgraduate level. She also works as a freelance translator and conference interpreter. She completed a PhD on professionalism in community interpreting and believes that education and training are the key for achieving high professional standards and recognition. Erika is also the AUSIT national PD co-ordinator.

Key Details

  • Date: Monday 23 January
  • Time: 6pm to 8pm
  • Venue: TAFE SA, Room: E 409, 120 Currie St Adelaide
  • Cost: AUSIT/ASLIA member $40, Non-member $60, AUSIT student member $20, Non member student $30
  • Snacks and refreshments will be served.

Click here for more details or to register.

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